Quick Start: Worksheets, Data Types, and the Table Header Row

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Worksheets in Spreadsheet.com look and work like the traditional spreadsheets you know, with a whole new set of capabilities that are accessible, intuitive, and powerful.

Let's start with some basics by exploring the structure of Spreadsheet.com worksheets, introduce you to the table header row, and summarize all of Spreadsheet.com's rich data types.

Once you're comfortable with these concepts you may want to dive into some other unique capabilities such as Sheet and Kanban views with custom filtering and sorting, linking worksheets together with related rows, creating row hierarchies, and expanding rows.

Worksheets Overview

Workbooks and worksheets in Spreadsheet.com work the same way they do in traditional spreadsheets, with a whole new set of capabilities that are accessible, intuitive, and powerful. Spreadsheet.com worksheets are made up of columns and rows as usual, but with several new features highlighted below:

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1: View Toolbar

In Spreadsheet.com, Views allow you to define different ways to showcase your worksheet's data. You can create as many views of a worksheet as you want. Each view allows you to hide columns, define sorts, and filter for criteria that are specific to that view only.

Different types of views allow you to view your worksheet data in a traditional Sheet view as well as other view styles like Kanban Views. For more about views and view types, see Quick Start: Views and Quick Start: Kanban views

2: Indenting and outdenting rows

Most buttons in the worksheet toolbar are similar to buttons in traditional spreadsheets. However, you will find two new buttons in Spreadsheet.com for indenting mceclip8.png and outdenting mceclip9.png rows.

You can use indenting and outdenting to create row hierarchies for task lists, project plans, organization structures, and more. For additional information about row hierarchies, see Quick Start: Indenting rows to create row hierarchies.

3: Range name box

The range name box displays the current cell or range of cells selected in your worksheet. Clicking on the range name box allows you to define and manage your named ranges, a name assigned to a contiguous range of cells for easy reference in formulas. For more information, check out our article on Named Ranges.

4: The primary column

Each worksheet contains a primary column shown with a key icon mceclip10.png in the column header. Cell values in the primary column are used as display names for rows. Display names for rows are used in many places, such as related row cells and row cards, Kanban cards, and more.

Any column can be the primary column, but there can be only one primary column per worksheet. For more about the primary column, see Quick Start: Columns, cells, and ranges.

5: Expanding rows

When you hover over a row with your mouse, or when one or more cells are selected in a row, you will see a blue expand icon mceclip0.png to the right of the row number in the row header. Clicking on a row's expand icon, or double-clicking the row header, opens the row in a form view. For more about working with expanded rows, see Quick Start: Rows.

6: The table header row

Sometimes, worksheets have a row that acts as a table header with labels for columns of data. In Spreadsheet.com, you can explicitly mark a row as the table header row, which will break the worksheet into a header region and a table region.

Only rows in the table region (i.e., rows below the table header row) are treated as table records (i.e., subject to sorting and filtering, rendering as cards in Kanban, etc.). For more about the table header row, see Table Header Row below. 

7: Worksheet Navigation

At the bottom of your workbook is the worksheet navigation bar.

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From here, you can view a list of all sheets (1), add a new blank worksheet to your workbook (2), and access and manage all of your existing worksheets (3). Clicking on the arrow to the right of a worksheet name opens a dropdown where you can delete, duplicate, rename, move, or hide the selected worksheet.

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8: Selection Calculator

In working with a spreadsheet, sometimes you need to quickly reference calculations along the way, but don’t need to include them within your spreadsheet’s data. Like traditional spreadsheets, you can quickly reference these simple calculations by selecting multiple cells and referencing the selection calculator in the bottom right corner of your workbook.

Unlike regular functions that you would input into a cell, using the selection calculator only requires selecting the function’s arguments and does not require any of the rest of the function’s syntax. The selection calculator appears automatically when two or more cells are selected. It can perform six functions: Count, Count Numbers, Sum, Average, Min, and Max.

Table Header Row

When working with spreadsheets, you often add general information to worksheets above rows that are organized in table form. For instance, rows above this tabular region might contain information about a project name, owner, overall timeline, etc.

In Spreadsheet.com, you can explicitly mark a row as the table header row so that only rows below your header rows are treated as table records. The table header row is denoted by the table header icon mceclip1.png to the left of the row number. Everything below this row will be treated as table records, and everything above it will be ignored when performing actions like sorting and filtering or rendering records as Kanban view cards.

In any worksheet, you can set a row as the table header row by right-clicking on the desired row and selecting Set row as table header. From there, the table header row icon mceclip1.png will appear to the right of the row number.

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In the example shown above, Row 4 will become the table header row, and Rows 5 onwards will be considered table records.

For more information about table records and the Table Header Row, check out our suite of articles on Tables and the Table Header Row.

Data Types

Spreadsheet.com goes beyond text and numbers with support for over 25 rich data types that you can choose from at the cell, range, and column level. Each column, range, and individual cell has a defined data type that you can change at any time.

To change the data type for a whole column at once, double-click the column header to open the Update column dialog. Or, click the downward arrow to the right of the column name and select "Edit data type..." from the top of the dropdown.

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From the Update column dialog, you can choose your intended data type from the "Type" field and configure the column accordingly. Note that each data type will have different configuration options.

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Whenever you add a new column, Spreadsheet.com will ask you to pick a data type (the default data type is Automatic).

You can also change the data type of individual cells and ranges. Cell and range-level data types override column data types—so you can put any kind of data, anywhere you want.

Working with columns is discussed in more detail in our next Quick Start article – Columns, cells, and ranges – and in our full suite of articles on columns. For more information about working with different Data Types, continue to the section below, or check out our full suite of articles on Data Types

Overview of Data Types

Below is an overview of each Data Type available in Spreadsheet.com. For more information about each one, check out our full suite of articles on Data Types, or click the "Read more" link at the end of each description below.

Featured

  • User: The User data type is for assigning users to rows. Quickly add existing users and invite new users. Optionally you can choose whether or not to notify added users. Read more
  • Attachment: The Attachment data type is for attaching images, documents, and other files within cells. Attachments are displayed as clickable thumbnails. Attached files can be previewed and downloaded by users. Read more
  • Select: The Select data type is for selecting a single value from a predefined set of options. Read more
  • Multiselect: The Multiselect data type is for selecting multiple values from a predefined set of options. Read more
  • Icon set: The Icon set data type is for selecting from a predefined set of symbols, such as Red/Yellow/Green, Harvey Balls, and other types of indicators. Read more

Relational

  • Related row: The Related row data type is for linking to rows in another worksheet. Create relationships to rows in any workbook you have access to, even workbooks in different folders. The Related row data type lets you link rows like tables in a relational database. Read more
  • Related row lookup: The Related row lookup data type is for looking up the value of a cell in a related row. You can configure which related worksheet column to lookup values from. Read more
  • Related row rollup: The Related row rollup data type allows you to perform calculations across linked rows in other worksheets and return aggregate data. Instead of returning raw data from related rows, Related row rollups can return summaries, or aggregates, of the related data. Read more

Standard

  • Automatic: The Automatic data type automatically converts entered data to the most appropriate data type. Similar to the default behavior of traditional spreadsheets, Automatic is the default data type for cells in Spreadsheet.com. Read more 
  • Text: The Text data type is for adding a short amount of text. Read more 
  • Number: The Number data type is for inputting numbers as integers or decimals with specific formatting defined by you. Read more
  • Currency: The Currency data type is for inputting currency values with a specific currency symbol and formatting defined by you. Read more
  • Percent: The Percent data type is for inputting percent values with specific formatting defined by you. Read more
  • Checkbox: The Checkbox data type is for toggling a true/false state (i.e., binary or boolean). Read more
  • Date: The Date data type is for inputting date values in a specific format defined by you. Read more
  • Date & time: The Date & time data type is for inputting date and time values in a specific format defined by you. Read more
  • Duration: The Duration data type is for representing a period of time in a specific format defined by you (e.g., the number of days elapsed between starting and ending dates). Read more
  • Email: The Email data type is for email addresses. Clicking opens a new email in your default email client. Read more
  • URL: The URL data type is for URLs that open in a separate browser tab when clicked. Read more
  • Phone: The Phone data type is for phone numbers, which you can format as links that open in your default voice calling application. Read more
  • Rating: The Rating data type is for assigning a ranking using a specific style (like stars, thumbs up, hearts, or more) and rating scale defined by you. Read more

Dynamic

  • Autonumber: The Autonumber data type is for automatically assigning a non-editable incremental value to uniquely identify rows. Optionally, configure a prefix, suffix, fill format, and starting number. This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell ranges. Read more
  • Column formula: The Column formula data type is for showing the result of a formula expression that computes a value based on other cells in the same row. Unlike cell formulas, column formulas do not require an "=" prefix. Also, column formulas can only contain references to columns, not individual cells or ranges. This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell ranges. Read more

System

  • Created at: The Created at data type is for displaying a non-editable date and time value showing when the row was created. This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell rangesRead more
  • Created by: The Created by data type is for displaying a non-editable user value showing who created the row. This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell ranges. Read more
  • Updated at: The Updated at data type is for displaying a non-editable date and time value showing when the row was most recently updated (i.e., when a cell in the row was most recently changed). This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell ranges. Read more
  • Updated by: The Updated by data type is for displaying a non-editable user value showing who the row was most recently updated by (i.e., who changed a cell in the row most recently). This data type can only be applied to columns, not individual cells or cell ranges. Read more 

In the next part of our Quick Start series, learn more about working with data in columns, cells, and ranges ➡️.